The Hobbyist's Machine Shop – Blog

"One Perfect Part at a Time"

Under great pressure

I have been under a lot of pressure these days, literally! The pressure I am talking about is air pressure that is stored in a tank. I have a very old compressor and tank that was once part of my roofing business tools. It was old when I bought the company. It was saved when I closed the company has been pressed into service in my workshops for another 10 years.

It is a two cylinder, CI, oil filled, “thumper”. The problem is it is now blowing oil into the pressure tank. After blowing air for my CNC mist system… Continue reading

Visit my shop

I posted some of my shop layout photos over in the TEDEX forum. You have to be an accepted member to enter the forum and see the photo’s. I have the membership request process setup so I screen every application. It may take anywhere from a few minutes to several days for me to respond to a request. Depends on my travel schedule, not who you are. 🙂

Dan’l

More than turkeys can get carved.

I have been enhancing some new skills in the Kautz workshop. I have been playing with high speed rotary carving. The tool is a jumbo dentist hand piece that is air powered and spins a mini turbine (and the tool bit) at 350,000 RPM. Yep, that number is correct. It is a lot of fun to play with and I am starting to get the knack. I plan on enhancing my woodworking projects with carvings. Here are some pictures of sample work.

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This is called “fish scales” This is a pretty bad example, but I am getting better. Honest!

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This… Continue reading

Exploding a possible myth?

I ran across one of the best reports I have read about the reasons for not using propane or a refrigerant tank for a receiver in a compressed air system. Here is the link in Horn & Whistle Magazine.

I have been in the HVAC business all my life and at first thought all those throw away refrigerant tanks must be good for something. In fact there was at least one manufacturer who was offering a kit to convert these tanks to portable air use. The kit consisted of a valve, gage and a short hose. I used one for… Continue reading

Taking care of the little bits.

I did my homework. I looked up the characteristics of 303 stainless steel. Then I had to do a bunch of rather interesting math. Here is the quote that caught my attention:

“Since Alloy 303 will work harden, it should be machined at reduced surface feet per minute and heavier feeds to prevent glazing at the tool interface.”

Circumfrence of a 1/8 inch diameter mill bit, Pi, surface feet per minute (SFM), number of flutes, feed in inches per revolution (IPR) per tooth, rotations per minute (RPM); all figured to the forth decimal. Phew! My math works out to 3361 RPM… Continue reading

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